Phenology and Seasonal Calendar

Phenology for December

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DECEMBER "WHEN-THEN"

Phenology for November

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November Phenology When all the mums are past their best, then major bird migrations will soon be over for the year. When the yellow witchhazel still blooms, gardeners should put in spring bulbs and dormant roses, and mulch perennials. Farmers should plant the final winter wheat and complete the harvest of corn of soybeans

Phenology for October

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October Phenology When Halloween crops have come to town, then the dark-eyed juncos will be returning to your bird feeders, When you see streaks of scarlet in the oaks and shades of pink on the dogwood trees, then cut your gourds, winter squash and pumpkins for winter storage. Harvest your grapes, too.

Phenology for September

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An Incomplete Wildflower Calendar for September September 1 Small White Aster September 2 Short’s Aster September 3 Heart-Leaved Aster September 4 New England Aster September 5 Forsythia—Autumn Bloom September 6 Autumn Crocus September 7 Zigzag Goldenrod

Phenology for August

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A Floating Sequence For the Blooming of Wildflowers and Perennials

Phenology for July

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A Floating Sequence For the Blooming of Shrubs, Trees, Wildflowers and Perennials

Phenology for June

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June Phenology: When-Then

Phenology for May

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A Floating Sequence For the Blooming of Shrubs, Trees, Wildflowers and Perennials May 1 Silver Olive, Sweet Gum May 2 Poppy, Daisy, Star of Bethlehem, Sedum May 3 White Mulberry, Mountain Maple, Wild Strawberry May 4 Locust, Black Walnut, Oaks, Golden Seal, Scarlet Pimpernel

Phenology for April

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When - Then for April --When nettles are six inches tall, then middle spring wildflowers are opening all over the woods.When you hear the shrill call of the American toad, that will be the time to plant all your corn.

Phenology for February and March

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FEBRURY WHEN-THEN IN THE LOWER MIDWEST When you hear mourning doves singing before dawn, then organize all your buckets for tapping maple syrup. When you hear the titmouse making its early mating calls, then test cattle for anaplasmosis.